News

PRIMAVERA twitter account posts: https://twitter.com/PRIMAVERA_H2020

12th Mar 2019

The final versions of the future SST and sea-ice forcings for the HighResMIP highresSST-future simulations were signed off by PCMDI. They can be found from the inputs4MIPs web site https://esgf-node.llnl.gov/search/input4mips/?institution_id=MOHC&target_mip_list=HighResMIP&query=version:20190308

14th Jan 2019

Several papers with associated graphics

Field P. R., et al., 2018: https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JD029295. Video here https://drive.google.com/open?id=1yXX7TShBwRVjO5gB8VDmdmFSRm4C4GcB

Papers by McCoy et al. - some snapshots on the Gallery page

13th Jan 2019

An article on PRIMAVERA written by Christopher Roberts for the ECMWF newsletter issue 157: https://www.ecmwf.int/en/newsletter/157/news/coordinated-climate-simulations-using-ifs

14th Dec 2018

BAMS article on "The Benefits of Global High Resolution for Climate Simulation: Process Understanding and the Enabling of Stakeholder Decisions at the Regional Scale" was published in BAMS - https://journals.ametsoc.org/toc/bams/current?_zs=AQkhc1&_zl=vFUH5.

11-12th Dec 2018

AGU Fall Meeting session on "High-Resolution Weather and Climate Modeling on Large Supercomputers" was held as posters and oral presentations. There was plenty of discussions in the poster session, and the room was pretty full for the orals which covered a range of topics. 

11th Dec 2018

Town Hall at AGU Fall Meeting (Washington DC) on climate extremes analysis for CMIP6. We had 6 speakers, 3 from PRIMAVERA (Malcolm, Rein and Pier Luigi), Michael Wehner (Berkeley), Allison Wing (Florida State) and Chia-Ying Lee (Lamont-Doherty). The topics ranged from data availability (particularly of HighResMIP simulations), and current or planned analysis of tropical cyclones, post-tropical cyclones and extra-tropical transition, precipitation and temperature extremes. There were ~50 people in the room and plenty of questions and discussion.

16th Nov 2018

We are now in possession of the future forcings (ozone, MACv2-SP-EasyAerosol and greenhouse gas concentrations) to enable us to start the future simulations with the coupled model. We still await some last files to start the future atmosphere-only simulations.

14th Nov 2018

There were two excellent project deliverables produced for this period.

One (WP2) summarised all the analysis work that has been ongoing to understand the impact of resolution on climate simulation, from both our atmosphere-only and coupled simulations.

One (WP3) documented the impact of our simplified aerosol forcing (called EasyAerosol or MACv2-SP) which most of our groups are using for the HighResMIP simulations, and comparing this to an interactive aerosol scheme.

These will appear on the public web pages in the next few months, after the usual checking procedures.

12th Nov 2018

We held a day long meeting at Schiphol airport to agree on the additional simulations that the groups would do ("Stream 2" in our language). Key to these will be to produce additional ensemble members following the HighResMIP protocol (as in Stream 1), to improve our signal-to-noise and better determine resolution-caused changes from internal variability. There will also be simulations that test out some of the new physics schemes that have been developed during the project.

25th Oct 2018

The AGU Fall meeting, Washington DC, Dec 10-14 2018.

There is a high resolution session: orals on Wednesday 12th Dec 1.30-3.30 - A33D "High-Resolution Weather and Climate Modeling on Large Supercomputers " in room 152A;  and poster session A23J on Tuesday 11th Dec 13.40-1800 in Hall A-C.

There is also a Town Hall meeting at 12.30-1.30 on Tuesday 11th Dec in Liberty L room on "Process Understanding and Climate Extremes Analysis for CMIP6". All welcome.

18th Oct 2018

Submission of abstracts is now open for the CMIP6 model analysis workshop in Barcelona in March 2019 (at which PRIMAVERA shares a common day during its General Assembly). Details at 

https://cmip6workshop19.sciencesconf.org/resource/page/id/7

18th Oct 2018

An article just published in Climate Dynamics, which is described at

https://climmisc.blogspot.com/2018/10/how-gulf-stream-sst-fronts-modify.html

shows how gradients in sea surface temperature can influence the movement of storm systems across the Atlantic.